Why you should spay your cat!

1. When is breeding season for cats?

Cats breed all year round but breeding season typically begins from September to March. When the weather starts becoming warmer and it gets light earlier, female unsprayed cats come on heat. This phase is known as oestrus which may begin as early as five months old. Cats have several heat cycles in a year unlike dogs that only have two. Breeding cats can therefore produce a litter at any time during the year!

A cat on heat is very vocal and even if you’ve never been around one before, you will definitely be able to hear her calling for a male cat.  Watch out for their strange behaviours too! Your kitty may likely be extremely affectionate, rolling or rubbing against you, other animals or objects in the home. She may spray urine in the same manner as a tomcat, have a strong desire to escape from the house or lose her appetite completely. She may also adopt a suggestive mating position - tail raised, rear end held high and constantly lick her genitals until they become swollen. First time cat owners often find this behaviour very disturbing. Our 100% homeopathic remedy, PetCalm will help to relieve stress and anxiety in your kitty for a soothing and calming effect.
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2. Why you should spay your cat?

An unspayed cat will have an average of two litters per year – an average of 2.8 kittens survive each litter. According to the SPCA, if an owner allows two cats and their offspring to breed for ten years, they are likely to produce 80,399,780 cats in that time! By not spaying or neutering your cats, owners are contributing to a serious pet population crisis. Many of these unwanted kitties and cats are left abandoned on the streets to become feral colonies or turn up at animal shelters or rescue groups. These shelters and rescue groups do not always have the means to care for large numbers of cats and in most cases, potential adopters will choose a kitten rather than an adult cat – sad but true!
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3. What happens if you don’t spay your female cat?

The life of an outdoor female cat is not an easy one! She will endure endless fights and be subjected to repeated mating. The mating process is very violent and aggressive and also stressful for cat and cat owner. Your cat will become the victim of her hormones and will do everything in her power attract every intact male in the neighbourhood. The yowling, fighting and spraying can become very unpleasant! She is also at risk of developing and spreading diseases.
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4. What happens if you don’t spay your male cat?

An intact male will constantly be governed by his hormones, feel frustrated, and want to roam in search of a female in heat. Very often, when searching for females, they find themselves in unknown territory and end up fighting with other stronger male cats – these fights usually end in tragedy!  Bite wounds which become abscesses and the transmission of FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) are the result of these fights, which cause big vet bills and ultimately can be fatal. They will also spray – especially on your furniture and belongings! Believe me, you’ll be doing your male the biggest favour by neutering him and preventing an overpopulation of cats!
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5. Should cats be allowed to go through one heat cycle or even have one litter before spaying?

This is a myth that cats should have one litter  before being spayed. By having your kitten or cat spayed or neutered at an early age means that you are being a RESPONSIBLE CAT OWNER - if you take into consideration the millions of animals that are euthanized at shelters because there simply are not enough homes for them. Spaying or neutering your cat also reduces their chances of developing breast and ovarian cancer later in life. A daily dose of C Caps to prevent cancer will definitely help your cat if she hasn’t been spayed.
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6. We keep our cat indoors!

If you’re under the impression that keeping your cat indoors will keep her from the trials and tribulations of outdoor life, you are sorely mistaken! Nothing will be able to prevent an unspayed cat from escaping – if she wants to get out, she’ll find a way. Most likely, she’ll also return pregnant! Spaying your cat will prevent the likelihood of your cat escaping to mate.
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7. How can I best help my cat recover after being spayed or neutered? 

Cats recover very quickly after being spayed or neutered. Male cats have just a little ‘snip’ and are soon back to normal after just a little discomfort. Female cats take a little longer but provided that you follow your vet’s advice about caring for the stitches, your cat will recover very fast. 
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