Upset & 'iffy' tummies: Cathy's tips!

If upset pet tummies are a regular in your home, THIS article is for YOU! No more cleaning up and adjusting food programs, Cathy shares her TOP TIPS to make sure your pet has an 'iron stomach' in easy practical steps! Learn the secrets to happy pet tummies! PLUS Newsletter subscribers, use the discount code 00170414 at checkout to save 10% on the products below this article. Valid until midnight tonight! 17 April 2014)

Pets and the upset tummy: Cathy's tips!

1. Why does MY pet suffer with a sensitive stomach?
Cathy says: "This is a question that I get asked a lot, but really it's luck of the draw and genetics. Some pets have a stomach of steel and can eat whatever they like without any digestive consequences, while others end up with severe cramps, flatulence, constipation, diarrhoea, vomiting or all of the above! I have seen small dogs manage to eat spicy rice with no problem, and large breeds ill over slightly different dog food, and vice versa - so there is not a particular breed that suffers more than the other breed."
HAVE A QUESTION related to your pet?
E-mail Feelgood Pets FREE of charge for advice, click here.

2. What should I do if my pet has digestive issues?
Cathy says: "First things first - cut out table scraps! Then, take a good look at your bought dog food. Does your dog’s food contain too much fat? (approximately 15 percent is ideal). Fat is hard to digest - rather choose carbohydrates and proteins. Try a pet food with both soluble and insoluble fiber. Many pet foods are especially formulated to deal with 'iffy tummies'. (There is also a great article on why raw food is good for animals, read it here). We love 'Vondi's' and Doggobone' natural pet foods without any preservatives or nasty additives - both available at the Feelgood Health shop in Westlake, Cape Town. Those pet foods with antioxidant qualities can actually improve digestive function, so make sure your dog’s food contains appropriate levels of vitamins A, C, and E, beta carotene, and selenium! If your pet really struggles with constipation, try a course of Flatulence Preventer - it's a natural remedy remedy that reduces gas as well as maintains digestive health and helps with the symptoms of digestive disorders, including diarrhoea and constipation. (There is also a great article here on types of foods to avoid - that can make your pets ill.)

For animals with an extremely sensitive digestive system, it is important to offer a more preventative approach. We have developed a really amazing natural remedy called Digestive Support which is formulated to be used daily to strengthen and balance your pet's digestive system and prevent tummy troubles in dogs and cats. I had one caller tell me that Digestive Support is the first thing she gives her pets in the mornings because she knows that it keeps 'things as they should be in the bowels of her animals' and she's too elderly to start cleaning up pet messes at her age! Digestive Supportreally works by naturally supporting the defence mechanisms in the body and acting to soothe irritated and inflamed tissues within the digestive tract. See here for more info.
HAVE A QUESTION related to your pet?
E-mail Feelgood Pets FREE of charge for advice, click here.

3. What is your best tip where an upset stomach is concerned ?
Cathy says: "My absolute top tip is to take a cue from nature!! When pets feel unwell they often chew at certain plants in the garden (sometimes even inducing vomiting to feel better). Animals in the wild also instinctively seek out herbs when they are ill. Natural remedies DO work (with no risk of side effects) and can really turn a digestive problem right around."
HAVE A QUESTION related to your pet?
E-mail Feelgood Pets FREE of charge for advice, click here.

4. What else is important as far as tips go for upset pet stomachs?
Cathy says:"Diarrhoea tends to clear up quicker if food is withheld for 24 hours, but never withhold food from very young pets or very ill pets (always allow access to water). Choose bland food (plain, skinless boiled chicken and rice) during the course of the diarrhoea and continue with this diet for at least 48 hours after the diarrhoea is resolved. Remember that the cells that line the digestive system will be inflamed and functioning less effectively during, and straight after a case of the runs. By feeding a bland diet, less strain is placed on these damaged cells and digestion will be more effective. Avoid suddenly changing your pet’s diet as this will cause an upset in the microflora that normally lives in the digestive system of your dog or cat. Always clean up after your pet, bad hygiene is a health risk for your pet and your family!"
PS. Newsletter subscribers, use the discount code 00170414 at checkout to save 10% on the products below this article. Valid until midnight tonight! 17 April 2014!
HAVE A QUESTION related to your pet?
E-mail Feelgood Pets FREE of charge for advice, click here.

5. What is cause for concern when it comes to upset stomachs for pets?
Cathy says: "Watch out for stomach issues that last - even after changing diet. If your animal's symptoms are more than just mild and intermittent, and/or switching to a highly-digestible food doesn’t improve the situation, talk to your veterinarian. Food allergy or inflammatory bowel disease can have symptoms that are similar to those seen in dogs with sensitive stomachs and will require medical action. Diarrhoea in pets can be related to something they have eaten, a viral infection, bacterial infection, worms, a foreign object they have swallowed and even diseases affecting other organs such as the liver or kidneys. Bloody diarrhoea with or without vomiting is always a reason to see the vet. "
HAVE A QUESTION related to your pet?
E-mail Feelgood Pets FREE of charge for advice, click here.

 

 

 

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