Pet travel sickness: Cathy's tips!

Hitting the road for a mini getaway with your pets? Are you dreading the car sickness, panting and whining? If you're taking your pets or leaving them in a kennel then THESE TIPS are going to save you a lot of hassle!  Here's what Pet Consultant Cathy Samuel has to say….

Pet Travel: Cathy's Tips!

1. What causes pets to become ill with motion sickness?
Cathy says: "Some animals become accustomed to travelling, but other animals have more problems with motion sickness and a more severe reaction to movement. It has a lot to do with the balance in the inner ear and the ability to regulate pressure in the ear. This imbalance of pressure can cause nausea or vomiting, fatigue and dizziness. This often happens when there is no visual cue from a horizon or when a pet is confined in a vehicle. This often makes the journey quite an ordeal for the owner and the animal."
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2. What kind of treatment is there for motion sickness in pets?
Cathy says: "Most conventional medications for motion sickness come with other side effects, so a better route is a natural remedy. AllisOne Kali Mur. Tissue Salt no. 5 relieves nausea and travel sickness and easy to administer to your pet. My best travel secret is to take this with you on your journey - keep a bottle in the car. It's also safe for junior pets as well as more mature animals to help avoid and also combat motion sickness. Before the journey, start dosing with AllisOne Kali Mur. Tissue Salt no. 5 every 30 minutes for about 2hrs before leaving - then dose during the trip if needed."  
HAVE A QUESTION about related to your pet?
E-mail Feelgood Pets FREE of charge for advice, click here.
 
3. What should an owner do to help pets cope with motion sickness?
Cathy says: "If your animal is scared of the car it may take a few days getting him used to the car by sitting with him in it for short periods and taking short trips often. On the day of the trip, limit food and water 3-4 hours before leaving. While on the road your pets should be adequately restrained, (cats in a veterinary approved cat carrier, dogs should travel on the back seat and be fitted with a seatbelt and harness specific for pets). Always monitor the temperature in the car to see if it is not too cold or too hot. Make make frequent rest stops on the way, and walk your animal every two to three hours - always keep your dog hydrated with fresh water and comfortable at all times. Take along a favourite blanket or toy to help your cat or dog feel more secure in the car. As a precaution, bring a good supply of newspapers and dry towels to prevent soiling of your vehicle and to keep your pet clean."
HAVE A QUESTION about related to your pet?
E-mail Feelgood Pets FREE of charge for advice, click here.
 
4. What precautions should I take if I am placing my pets in a kennel?
Cathy says: "The number one thing when putting pets in a kennel is the risk of Kennel Cough. It is a highly contagious upper respiratory infection that often affects animals that are kept in a confined space. I always tell owners to start their pets on Immunity and Liver Support capsules to boost a pet's immune functioning and resistance against disease and infection before going into the kennel. Ask the kennel beforehand if they have had any cases of Kennel cough or Parvo (another contagious disease) in the last six months. As a precaution, KC Defense is a wonderful natural remedy that can be used to help the respiratory system ward off infection. Always inspect the kennel (surprise visit is best) to see the living standards and hygiene level. Trust your gut - if it smells unclean or animals look sickly and unhappy, then it's time to look for a better kennel. Ask your vet to recommend a really good place." 
HAVE A QUESTION about related to your pet?
E-mail Feelgood Pets FREE of charge for advice, click here.
 
5. A note about food treats:
Cathy says: "On holiday trips it's always tempting to give pets an extra treat or two especially to keep them well-behaved in the car. Please remember that all year round (Easter is especially problematic), chocolate is NEVER allowed as it is toxic to animals. There are plenty of safe healthy treats that your pet will enjoy just as much - your animal cannot tell the difference between an Easter egg and a dog biscuit. Remember that unhealthy human food is likely to upset your pet's stomach and that means plenty of tidying up mess - and that's not holiday fun! Always know the number of your nearest vet at your destination in case of emergency and if you can take a pet first aid kit with you too. If you're not sure if it's an emergency, read this checklist of emergency situations with pets."
HAVE A QUESTION about related to your pet?
E-mail Feelgood Pets FREE of charge for advice, click here.
 

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